Jonesboro Disorderly Conduct Lawyer

Serving the Community for 30 Years

Every state has a disorderly conduct law which makes it a crime to be drunk in public, disturb the peace, or loiter in certain areas. Although subjective, a disorderly conduct charge is nothing to ignore. If you are convicted, you could face up to 3 months in jail for a simple misdemeanor. If a firearm is involved, charges could increase to a felony and you could end up in prison for years.

At Ford & Cook, we take the presumption of innocence very seriously. Even if our clients may have engaged in disorderly conduct, the state bears the burden of proof and must show each and every element of the crime. Often, even if the offense was committed, prosecutors have challenges proving the case. Our experienced Jonesboro criminal defense lawyers know how to make the proper objections to ensure your rights are protected.

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What Is Disorderly Conduct?

Disorderly conduct, also known as “disturbing the peace,” is an umbrella term for various offenses involving disruptive behavior. Under Arizona law, a prosecutor must prove that the defendant intended to disturb the peace and they engaged in fighting, violence, or other disruptive behavior.

Disruptive behavior can be interpreted as throwing a situation into turmoil and interrupting it to the extent of stopping. Examples include:

  • Using abusive or offensive language in public
  • Fighting and assault
  • Misconduct involving a firearm or dangerous weapon
  • Making unreasonable noise, such as with a loud party
  • Domestic violence
  • Refusing to leave the scene of a fire or other emergency.

Juveniles who act out in school or get in fights are frequently charged with disorderly conduct.

Penalties for Disorderly Misconduct

While disorderly misconduct may seem like a trivial offense, you can receive a class 1 misdemeanor, which is the highest level of misdemeanor in Arizona, or a felony. Below are the penalties for both of these charges:

Misdemeanor: Unless the charge involves a deadly weapon, disorderly conduct is a class 1 misdemeanor. A class 1 misdemeanor carries $3600 in fines and up to 6 months in jail, with a maximum of 3 years of probation. If you’re convicted of domestic violence disorderly conduct, you face the loss of the right to own or possess a firearm and you must complete at least 26 weeks of a mandated domestic violence program.

Felony: If you’re charged with disorderly conduct involving a deadly weapon, it’s a class 6 felony which carries a maximum of 2 years of imprisonment, and higher fines and harsher probation. If you have a record of felony convictions, you could face as much as 6 years in prison for subsequent arrests.

Common Defenses to Disorderly Conduct

One of the most important reasons you need a criminal defense attorney on your side is because they know the best defense for your case. If you’ve been charged with disorderly conduct, your legal defense can argue that you didn’t have the right state of mind, there was no criminal act, or that you acted in self-defense.

If you have been arrested for disorderly conduct or another misdemeanor in Arizona, contact our Jonesboro criminal defense lawyers at Ford & Cook. Our goals is to provide you with a service that will be of benefit to you and your family.

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